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test cache 3 tennis

Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don’t worry—it’s just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits down. Drop Shot

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Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

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Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

Title here

Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

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Getting to know test: Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure

Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure. 

  1. Tilt your hands so that your pinky fingers are closer to the sky when your hands move away from each other, what is called the “out scull.” When your hand move towards each other—during the “in scull”—slightly tilt your palms so your thumbs are closer to the sky.
  2. Too much tilting is detrimental. Your palms should always be closer to parallel to the surface than perpendicular. When it’s right, you will be able to feel the pressure on your hands and forearms.
  3. Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don’t worry—it’s just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits down.
  4. Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure
  5. Tilt your hands so that your pinky fingers are closer to the sky when your hands move away from each other, what is called the “out scull.” When your hand move towards each other—during the “in scull”—slightly tilt your palms so your thumbs are closer to the sky.
  6. Too much tilting is detrimental. Your palms should always be closer to parallel to the surface than perpendicular. When it’s right, you will be able to feel the pressure on your hands and forearms.
  7. Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don’t worry—it’s just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits down.
  8. Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure.
  9. Tilt your hands so that your pinky fingers are closer to the sky when your hands move away from each other, what is called the “out scull.” When your hand move towards each other—during the “in scull”—slightly tilt your palms so your thumbs are closer to the sky.
  10. Too much tilting is detrimental. Your palms should always be closer to parallel to the surface than perpendicular. When it’s right, you will be able to feel the pressure on your hands and forearms.
  11. Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don’t worry—it’s just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits down.
  12. Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure.
  13. Tilt your hands so that your pinky fingers are closer to the sky when your hands move away from each other, what is called the “out scull.” When your hand move towards each other—during the “in scull”—slightly tilt your palms so your thumbs are closer to the sky.
  14. Too much tilting is detrimental. Your palms should always be closer to parallel to the surface than perpendicular. When it’s right, you will be able to feel the pressure on your hands and forearms.
  15. Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don’t worry—it’s just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits down.
  16. Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure.
  17. Tilt your hands so that your pinky fingers are closer to the sky when your hands move away from each other, what is called the “out scull.” When your hand move towards each other—during the “in scull”—slightly tilt your palms so your thumbs are closer to the sky.
  18. Too much tilting is detrimental. Your palms should always be closer to parallel to the surface than perpendicular. When it’s right, you will be able to feel the pressure on your hands and forearms.
  19. Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don’t worry—it’s just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits down.
  20. Begin support sculling. The goal is to create enough water pressure to make the surface of the water “boil” above your hands and forearms. If the surface of the water is still, you will not have enough pressure.
  21. Tilt your hands so that your pinky fingers are closer to the sky when your hands move away from each other, what is called the “out scull.” When your hand move towards each other—during the “in scull”—slightly tilt your palms so your thumbs are closer to the sky.
  22. Too much tilting is detrimental. Your palms should always be closer to parallel to the surface than perpendicular. When it’s right, you will be able to feel the pressure on your hands and forearms.
Go to a part of the pool where you can stand on the bottom (don't worry—it's just a drill, no penalties here). You should be underwater from armpits...
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